Therapies

Athlete's Foot Treatment

If untreated, skin blisters and cracks caused by Athlete's Foot can cause serious bacterial infections. The treatment of Athlete's Foot depends on the type and extent of the fungal infection, so it is important to consult our practice before choosing a therapy. 

 

Athlete's Foot can usually be treated with antifungal creams. Re-infection is common, so it is important to continue the therapy as prescribed, even if the fungus appears to have gone away. Lasting cases of Athlete's Foot may require foot soaks before applying antifungal creams. Severe infections that appear suddenly (acute) usually respond well to treatment. Toenail infections that develop with Athlete's Foot tend to be more difficult to cure than fungal skin infections.

Physical Therapy 

Physical therapy can often help decrease the pain and swelling in a painful area of the foot or ankle. Heel spurs, bursitis, plantar fasciitis, bunions, corns and calluses, as well as many post-operative surgical conditions, respond well to physical therapy.

 

Common kinds of physical therapy may include hot packs, massage, paraffin baths, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, and diathermy (deep heating of tissues through use of electric current) to relieve pain and swelling, increase range of motion, prevent joint stiffening, rebuild muscle strength, and support the proper alignment of foot structures.

Neurolysis

Neurolysis is a therapeutic procedure used to treat neuromas. During this nonsurgical procedure, the affected nerve is chemically destroyed via seven weekly injections of ethanol mixed with a local anesthetic. Because nerve tissue has an affinity for ethanol, it absorbs the substance, which, after repeated exposure, becomes toxic and destroys the pain-causing nerve. Neurolysis has a success rate of more than 60 percent. However, this treatment modality is not widely accepted by insurance companies.